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Simple Car Shopping Strategies You Can’t Shop Without

You should take the car-buying process very seriously. Many people are so happy about the prospect of buying a car that they do not think of the seriousness of the task. Buying a car is a serious financial investment, and you should do all you can to remain businesslike.

Go into the dealership with a bottom line price in mind. The salesman might try to focus on the monthly payments or financing terms, but your goal should be to get the price you want on the car you want. You can always negotiate the financing terms later, or even finance with your own bank outside of the dealership.

When shopping for a new vehicle, consider all of your options. There are many used cars that have extremely low miles and rock bottom prices. The ones to look for are the ones that have been leased and returned. These cars have been serviced at the dealership and usually have plenty of factory warranty protection left.

Read all of the fine print that is on the contract for the car you want to purchase. Even if you think the car salesman is being perfectly honest with you about everything involved, you need to make sure you are not signing anything that you will have regrets about later.

Refrain from bringing up incentives or down payments before negotiating. You want these extras to reduce the price. This will help you get a better deal.

If the price of a car is non-negotiable, see if you can negotiate on other terms. Some dealerships will agree to provide several months’ worth of free gasoline or a year of free oil changes, for instance. It never hurts to ask if a salesman can sweeten the deal.

Make sure to take your time. Even if you are really excited about buying a car, don’t run out and buy it on the same day. Make sure that you have taken the time to do research on safety, repairs and other factors before doing something you might end up regretting.

Be firm in what extras you want. Almost every salesperson is going to at least attempt to “upsell” you in an effort to get a bigger sale. Don’t let them pressure you into the next model up or features you don’t need. If they claim not to have the model you are looking for in stock, only the “better” one, ask if they can locate one at another dealer.

Look online for prices nearby as well as in the city where you live. You may be able to find a cheaper price in another city because often, different zip codes have different prices. Look at the trends in prices online so you can figure out who has the best deal.

Never buy a car without test driving it first. That even includes brand new cars and trucks. Not only do you want to make sure the car is mechanically sound, you also want to see how the car fits you. Decide if the car “feels” right. Some cars are not designed for taller people, for instance.

Check your credit score before you head to the dealership to make a car purchase. Even if you are doing well financially at this time, you may not be able to afford the high finance charges that are associated with less than stellar credit. It would be difficult to go to a dealer, fall in love with a car and then fond out you cannot afford the finance charges.

Really think about the bells and whistles you will need on your car. Many trim options are only available with certain packages. For example, if you want heated seats, you may be required to buy a package that includes leather seats. You may have to make a few concessions in what you get or how much you’ll have to pay to move up to higher trim levels.

After you have settled on a price you find attractive, discuss the trade-in you have. You might not get a great deal on your trade in, but do not be stern and do make compromises. You’ve already put in a lot of time and effort, so closing the deal is essential.

What Are Powered Two-Wheelers (PTWs)?

The term “Powered Two-Wheeler” (PTW) comprises a wide diversity of vehicles. The products are divided into different segments such as moped, scooter, street, classic, super-sport, touring, custom, supermoto and off-road motorcycles.

PTWs are one of the most affordable styles of personal transport in many parts of the world. In various countries, PTWs are also the most common type of motor vehicle.

In the international regulatory environment, in particular, UNECE, PTWs are referred to with the term: ‘category L’ vehicles.

IMMA represents the manufacturing and trade industry of mopeds, motorcycles, and three-wheelers. Therefore, IMMA refers to PTWs as Powered Two and Three-Wheeled Vehicles.

The groups for PTWs category as applied by UNECE1 are:

Even though there are around 1.2 million powered two-wheelers (PTWs) within the United Kingdom, riders are often misconceived as living at the edge of society; however, this is often far from the truth. Riding a PTW is a high-risk activity, and those who cycle are often perceived as being ‘risk junkies,’ but through an in-depth exploration of this leisure activity, Motorcycling and Leisure explains that riders ride because they enjoy it and do not necessarily enjoy the risk associated. The book offers a range of modern research on riders and how they find enjoyment. The book further explores the rider goal of pleasure and utilizes Fuller’s task homeostasis theory along with Csikszentmihalyi’s theory of flow to develop an understanding of the interaction between risk and goals. In conclusion, it establishes principles of interventions with the aim of guiding intervention design and reducing the number of motorcycle crashes.